The FCC gets the internet

The FCC will introduce a national broadband plan tomorrow to Congress that puts the internet front and centre as the most important medium in the United States. While broadcasters will hate it, I say it’s a long-needed move. The internet has usurped so many other industries in a path of creative destruction that should be further encouraged. Power is sapping from big broadcasters to tiny producers, in media and otherwise, and I’m glad the FCC recognizes this fact. If only Canada would do the same.

Is Apple becoming Microsoft?

That’s the contention of Daniel Lyons, the ex “Fake Steve Jobs” and current columnist for Newsweek. Lyons claims that Apple has gone from being a niche player in the PC business to a monopoly force for content distribution…and he’s got a point. Macs are selling better than ever before (and I’ll never, EVER switch back to PC) but the real money and influence is in the iPhones, iPods, and other content-centric devices Apple continues to sell like mad. But at the same time, Apple controls essentially every point of entry for that content, much like Microsoft did (and got slammed for, hard) with Internet Explorer.

But where Apple differs from Microsoft is execution. They’ve put us all in a gilded cage but damn, those are some shiny bars, and it’s really comfortable inside this cage, and…well, you get the idea. It comes down to convenience versus principle, and I have to admit that for me, the ability to tote everything around on my iPhone trumps ethical qualms I have about Apple’s choke hold on how we access our movies and music. Which sort of makes me Apple’s bitch, though I’m not alone.

Ars Technica bought for $25 million

I was surprised by this news, though I’m not sure why. Ars Technica has been a great resource for technology info for years, and it was only a matter of time before someone snapped them up. That someone is Conde Nast, who will be folding Ars into the Wired Digital network, also known ad Condenet.

But it’s important to note that Ars is no fly-by-night payday. The site has been operating since 1998, first as a labor of love and later as a viable business. It succeeds because the site gives first-rate analysis and news on topics a niche audience want to read about, like games, all things Apple, science and computer hardware. And it took ten years to get to this point, something that some startups forget in their rush to get bought out.